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Police at protest at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital

Police are at a protest outside the hospital where terminally-ill Liverpool boy Alfie Evans is being cared for.

It comes a day after a High Court judge expressed his sympathy for the parents of the 23-month-old who is approaching death after being at the centre of a life-support treatment battle.

Merseyside Police said they were in attendance at a protest outside Alder Hey Children’s Hospital and appealed to protesters to be respectful.

The force said on Twitter: “We can confirm that officers are at @AlderHey to monitor a peaceful protest tonight, Thursday 12 April.

“Please note that access to the hospital is currently being disrupted and protesters are asked to be respectful of other patients and visitors trying to access the location.”

Tom Evans outside the High Court after a judge ruled doctors can stop providing life-support treatment to son Alfie  (John Stillwell/PA)
Tom Evans outside the High Court after a judge ruled doctors can stop providing life-support treatment to son Alfie (John Stillwell/PA)

On Wednesday, Mr Justice Hayden described what had happened to Alfie as “profoundly unfair” as he endorsed an end-of-life care plan drawn up by specialists.

Alfie’s parents Tom Evans and Kate James, who are both in their 20s and from Liverpool, have lost treatment fights in the High Court, Court of Appeal, Supreme Court and European Court of Human Rights.

In February, Mr Justice Hayden ruled that doctors at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital in Liverpool could stop treating Alfie against the wishes of his parents following hearings in the Family Division of the High Court in London and Liverpool.

On Wednesday, during a follow-up hearing in London, he endorsed a plan put forward by Alder Hey doctors for withdrawing life support treatment.

The judge said detail of that plan could not be revealed because Alfie was entitled to privacy at the end of his life.

A video posted on Facebook features Alfie’s father Tom filming his son in the hospital and holding a letter which he says states he has the right to leave with his child.

The words “Christian Legal Centre” can be seen at the top of the letter.

“I have documentation that says I have the right to take my son out of the hospital, I have the right to take my son out of this hospital,” he says in the video.

Mr Evans said the documentation says he is allowed to leave legally, and that he has removed the duty of care and given it to their air ambulance company.

“Alder Hey phoned the police to murder my son,” he said.

“Alder Hey have phoned the police to stop me from taking my son out of the hospital. This is my son. Look at my healthy, healthy young boy who is undiagnosed, who is certainly not dying.”

During the nearly two-and-a-half minute clip he also encouraged people to come to the hospital to stand outside and “tell them to release our son” in a “quiet protest”.

He added: “They have phoned the police over a child… Look how innocent the boy is, look at him, he lies there eagerly waiting for his trip home.

“How can this come to this?”

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