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Tyson Fury back in the UK for fight with Dillian Whyte at Wembley on April 23

Tyson Fury and Dillian Whyte will meet at Wembley Stadium (PA)
Tyson Fury and Dillian Whyte will meet at Wembley Stadium (PA)

Tyson Fury is set for an epic homecoming in his first fight on UK soil in nearly four years when he defends his WBC heavyweight title against Dillian Whyte on April 23 at Wembley Stadium.

Whyte signed his contract earlier this week to pave the way for a showdown against Fury, whose co-promoter Frank Warren won the right to stage the fight after a record 41million US dollars (£30million) offer at purse bids.

And Warren announced on Friday afternoon the British rivals will face-off at the English national football stadium, which will be Fury’s first fight in the UK since outpointing Francesco Pianeta in Belfast in August 2018.

Fury (31-0-1, 22KOs) has fought exclusively in the United States since then after signing a promotional deal with Bob Arum’s Top Rank and he became a world champion again by stopping Deontay Wilder in February 2020 in Las Vegas.

He returned to Sin City last October to retain his crown for the first time in an absorbing trilogy contest against the American, who was knocked out in the 11th round of a fight featuring five knockdowns – Wilder three, Fury two.

Warren said: “Tyson Fury coming home to fight under the arch at Wembley Stadium is a fitting reward for the number one heavyweight in the world following his exploits across the Atlantic in his epic trilogy against Deontay Wilder.

“The fact that this mandatory defence of his WBC title comes against another Briton only adds to the occasion. They are two of the biggest characters in British sport and both normally have plenty to say for themselves.

“It is going to be an incredible night and a huge occasion for sport in this country that will capture the imagination of fans right across the world.”

Tyson Fury, pictured, settled his rivalry with Deontay Wilder last October (Kieran Cleeves/PA)
Tyson Fury, pictured, settled his rivalry with Deontay Wilder last October (Kieran Cleeves/PA)

Ending his rivalry with Wilder put Fury on a collision course with Whyte, who has not fought since last March when he avenged a surprise loss to Russian veteran Alexander Povetkin in Gibraltar to once more become the WBC’s number one ranked contender.

With the fighters’ camps unable to broker an agreement, Warren prevailed at purse bids but there was speculation Whyte (28-2, 19KOs) was seeking to renegotiate the terms of his deal as he is entitled to just a 20 per cent split.

The Londoner ultimately put pen to paper hours before the 6am deadline on Tuesday, much to the relief of Top Rank president Todd DuBoeuf, who said on Sky Sports News: “I always felt it wouldn’t happen.

“You have to kind of pre-condition yourself to expect the worst, then have a pleasant surprise when things do work out. Everyone was a gentlemen. It’s going to be a magical, magical night.”

While Whyte has largely kept himself out of the spotlight in the last couple of months, Fury confirmed on Tuesday that he would be abstaining from social media to give his opponent “all the respect in the world that he needs”.

Arum added: “Tyson Fury conquered America, and it is only fitting that he defends the heavyweight championship in a packed Wembley Stadium.

“Dillian Whyte has called for this fight for years, and while he is a deserving challenger, no heavyweight can match ‘The Gypsy King.’

“This is going to be a momentous night of boxing with tens of thousands of fans in attendance at Wembley Stadium.”

Tickets for the event will go on sale at midday on Wednesday, March 2.

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