Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Public Enemy’s Chuck D reveals Flavor Flav feud was a hoax

Chuck D from Public Enemy says Flavor Flav remains a member (Anthony Harvey/PA)
Chuck D from Public Enemy says Flavor Flav remains a member (Anthony Harvey/PA)

Chuck D has revealed Flavor Flav is still a member of Public Enemy, and his recent firing was a hoax to promote their new music.

Founding member Flavor Flav parted ways with the hip hop group in March following a supposed spat over an appearance at a Bernie Sanders rally.

The rapper later criticised his former bandmate on Twitter, saying Chuck D could not fire him because “there is no Public Enemy without Flavor Flav”.

Chuck D has now revealed, in an announcement on April Fool’s Day, that the spat was orchestrated to show how some media covered bad news over good when it came to hip hop.

The pair have been working together in secret and Flavor Flav appears on Food As A Machine Gun, the lead single from Chuck D’s new album with his Enemy Radio project, out on Wednesday.

Chuck D said in a statement: “I had watched Orson Welles’ War Of The Worlds from 1938 when he pulled the wool over the public’s eyes as they put 100% belief in the technology of radio.

“Most people followed like a Pavlovic dog just like they do now. Flav doesn’t do benefits and stays away from political events – we been cool and always agreed about that.

Rhythm & Vines Festival – New Zealand
Flavor Flav had previously said there was ‘no Public Enemy’ without him (PA)

“Enemy Radio was built for that reason, to be a DJ+MC auxiliary unit of Public Enemy, a no-slack homage tossback to DJ+MC roots.

“It is DJ Lord, myself and Jahi with the S1Ws. Hearing the confused mush of political talk while under the bowels of Trumpotus made me use a presidential stage as my platform.

“Out of this storm came a plan between Flav and me to remind people that what’s important should have as much, if not more, value than just what’s popular.

“Thus came the HOAX, our War Of The Worlds

“Believe half of what you hear and NONE of what you see.”

Public Enemy were formed in Long Island, New York, in 1986 and released hits such as Fight The Power, Rebel Without A Pause and Don’t Believe The Hype.

They were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2013.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]