Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Businesses could wait until next year to learn results of controversial rates rises

Post Thumbnail

Hotels in the north-east could have to wait until next year to find out if controversial rates rises will be overturned.

Rates assessors have been inundated with appeals since the rateable value revaluation was first revealed in 2017, with traders across the region faced with soaring fees.

Almost 40% of new bills issued in April 2017 have been challenged after many firms’ liabilities soared – on average by more than a fifth.

Business rates package agreed for Aberdeen

The latest revaluation caused fury – with many feeling unfairly penalised as the rateable value was based on 2015 property values before the oil and gas downturn was fully felt.

The Scottish Government has extended a 12.5% cap for hotels and offices until next April, which amounts to £15.88% including inflation.

However many businesses may still have to bear the brunt of the increase after the cap is lifted due to the backlog in appeals.

A number of businesses have now been told they might have to wait until next year to find out if their appeal would be looked at.

Diane Wills, who owns The Crown Hotel in Inverbervie with husband David, added: “In 2013 I refurbished and changed the function room into bedrooms, it took them days to change my rates.

“It’s funny how when it comes to them getting money it takes no time at all but when it’s the other way around it takes years.

“It’s ridiculous. My rates have gone up by £630 per month over the 10 months.

“We need to do something, it’s becoming untenable.”

North-east MSP Liam Kerr has now written to Finance Minister Derek Mackay calling for more government support to help assessors deal with the appeals.

A Scottish Government spokesman said: “Valuation appeals are part of an independent statutory legal process and may ultimately be determined by the court of session.

“We have no locus to intervene in any independent legal hearings, including valuation appeals, but all ratepayers have the right to request an expedited hearing.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]