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North-east drug dealer claims stun gun disguised as iPhone was harmless – because he couldn’t work out how to charge it

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A north-east drug dealer bought a disguised stun gun but claimed he couldn’t get it to work because he couldn’t find a charger for it.

Barry Whyte, 41, told detectives that the weapon, which looked like an iPhone, couldn’t injure anybody because the battery was empty.

The High Court in Edinburgh yesterday heard how Whyte’s home in Farquhar Road, Aberdeen, was raided on June 23 2017.

Officers went to the property after receiving a tip-off that he was selling drugs and found small quantities of diazepam.

Prosecution lawyer Mark McGuire told the court that Whyte’s possession of the stun gun meant that he breached strict firearms legislation.

Mr McGuire added: “Regarding the disguised stun gun, the accused stated that he had bought it for his own protection but had been unable to get it to work because he could not obtain a charger.

“Examination of the accused’s mobile phone did reveal various messages which made it clear that the accused had been supplying diazepam to other people since June 10 2017 and had been selling strips of 10 tablets for £10.”

The story emerged after Whyte, now of Church Crescent in New Pitsligo, pleaded guilty before judge Lady Scott to being involved in the supply of diazepam between June 10 2017 and June 23 in 2017.

He also admitted breaching the 1968 Firearms Act.

Mr McGuire said police charged the the stun gun and found it worked, “with a visible and audible display of sparks”.

Lady Scott deferred sentence for the court to obtain reports on Whyte.

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