Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

The “suicide missions” of the Arctic Convoy

The HMS Anson
The HMS Anson

The perilous Arctic Convoy runs between 1941 and 1945 were called “the suicide missions” by many of those who sailed on them.

Merchant boats with supplies and ammunition were escorted by Royal Navy warships from Britain to the Soviet Union during World War II, usually in sub-zero temperatures.

The supplies they delivered were vital to the war effort as German forces had Russia blockaded on land.

A total of 78 convoys sailed to and from Russia, escorted by various allied navies, including the Russian fleet.

In addition to the British merchant navy, Russian, US, Canadian, Norwegian and Dutch merchant fleets were also involved.

In December 2014, a group of eight Russian Arctic Convoy veterans visited Inverness as part of a reunion tour with their British shipmates.

It was a poignant return to the Highlands for the mariners, many of whom had sailed from Loch Ewe in Wester Ross to carry supplies to allies in Russia.

Just a few weeks earlier, eight British veterans were presented with Ushakov Medals from the Russian Federation as a symbol of Russia’s infinite gratitude to Britain’s Arctic heroes.

A group of British veterans visited St Petersburg in 2014 for the 73rd anniversary of the first Arctic Convoy mission.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]