Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner. Facebook Messenger An icon of the facebook messenger app logo. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Facebook Messenger An icon of the Twitter app logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. WhatsApp Messenger An icon of the Whatsapp messenger app logo. Email An icon of an mail envelope. Copy link A decentered black square over a white square.
Post Thumbnail

Scottish Government puts the squeeze on mackerel fishers

The Scottish Government is holding onto valuable mackerel quota while it gauges the success of voluntary efforts by fishers to help increase the amount of fish they land into the country’s ports.

Finlay Carson, fisheries spokesman for the Scottish Conservatives, has accused the SNP administration at Holyrood of “holding fishermen to ransom”.

Earlier this year, it emerged Scotland’s fishing fleet may be given new targets for landings into the country’s ports.

The move is being looked at in order to deter boats, particularly in the pelagic sector, catching species including mackerel and herring, from landing their fish abroad.

Scottish vessels landed 38% of their total catch by volume and 25% of it by value into foreign ports in 2015, which is the most recent year for which there are figures.

The bulk of the volume of fish landed overseas that year (95%) comprised pelagic species, with mackerel worth £75million accounting for 70% of the total.

Rural Economy and Connectivity Cabinet Secretary Fergus Ewing told MSPs in parliament a few months ago that recent attempts to introduce a voluntary scheme to encourage more skippers to land into Scottish ports had achieved “very little progress”.

Yesterday, a government spokesman said: “The Scottish Government actually increased the mackerel quota last year.

“It is only this proportion that we are holding temporarily while we evaluate the voluntary action taken by the pelagic sector towards more landings into Scotland and how they support our onshore processing factories and jobs.

“The cabinet secretary has been meeting those involved in the issue and the quota situation will be clarified well in advance of the next mackerel fishery.”

According to the Scottish Conservatives, the government is holding onto 12% of the 2017 mackerel quota in a “disproportionate move that holds fishermen to ransom”.

Calling on Mr Ewing to release the quota, Mr Carson said withholding it was not the way to go.

Mr Carson added: “Without quota, fishermen cannot catch any fish. If they cannot catch any fish, they cannot make a living.

“Withholding part of the mackerel quota, the most important fishery in Scotland, only seeks to play with the livelihoods of hard-working Scottish fishermen.

“This is an entirely disproportionate decision by the Scottish Government. Fergus Ewing is apparently intent on achieving his landings targets at any cost.

“While I fully support the ambition to see more fish landed in Scotland’s ports, holding fishermen to ransom is not the way to achieve this.”