Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Highland community planning to turn a forgotten piece of history into an annual event

Sandy Mackay of Golspie cuts the turf for a battlefield trail marker post with Shirley Sutherland. of Golspie Heritage Society, John Melville, society chairman and  project leader Patrick Marriott.
Sandy Mackay of Golspie cuts the turf for a battlefield trail marker post with Shirley Sutherland. of Golspie Heritage Society, John Melville, society chairman and project leader Patrick Marriott.

A previously forgotten Highland battle will now be marked every year as part of plans to revive interest in the historic event.

The Battle of Littleferry on April 15 1746 has been overshadowed by events the following day when Jacobite soldiers were defeated by government troops at Culloden.

However, a project to raise awareness of the largely lost, but important, battle now and in the future is gathering pace.

First battlefield markers installed

The first markers have been erected for a battlefield trail to add to tourism attractions in the Golspie area.

The popularity of the multi-million selling Outlander books and TV series has increased interest in Culloden, the 1745 Jacobite Rising and associated battles.

This week Sandy Mackay from Golspie cut the turf for a marker at Shore Street as part of the project organised by Golspie Heritage Society.

Sandy is originally from Embo where several Mackays involved in the battle eventually settled.

It is understood that many present day Mackays in the village are their descendants.

Patrick Marriott has written a book on the battle.

A huge seven-tonne stone from the side of Ben Bhraggie has been engraved with the names of fallen soldiers.

It will be placed on a site on the Golspie to Littleferry road.

The first full history of the battle has been completed and will be printed in time for a major commemoration event on April 15.

Interest has already been shown from people from as far afield as Australia and Canada as well as local outlets.

The Golspie branch of the Royal British Legion Scotland has also agreed to hold a ceremony each year on that date to mark the battle in future.

Real energy about the project

Littleferry resident Major General Patrick Marriott, a former commandant of the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst, is behind the idea.

He has also written the book of the battle and a battlefield guide.

“I’m very pleased with progress. We have a wonderful team of people who all love the community and there is a real energy about the whole project.

“It’s good news and we need good news, so it’s been a great time to do it.

“I was very keen that we set this up for the long game. So I invited Royal British Legion Scotland (RBLS) to look at doing an annual ceremony and it is great news they have agreed.

The memorial stone which will be engraved with the names of the fallen soldiers.

“It provides continuity and means every year the project gets refreshed effectively and doesn’t get forgotten.”

This year’s memorial will involve massed bands and RBLS veterans.

Local branch treasurer Kenny McAulay said: “The first time I heard the story of the battle and the link to Culloden it was fascinating.

“We will have now have an event to mark it every year. It’s important for us to be involved and carry this on.”

The battle involved a 300-400 strong regiment under the Earl of Cromartie and three Government-supporting militia companies.

Jacobite plans revealed

Cromartie’s men were heading to join Prince Charles at Culloden from Caithness and Sutherland under orders to gather ammunition, money and recruits.

They arranged to march from Dunrobin Castle to Littleferry, but their plan was revealed and were attacked.

About 50 were killed and 178 were captured in the battle near St Andrew’s Church in Golspie, along the ferry road and at the harbour.

News of the defeat would have raised the spirits of the Duke of Cumberland and lowered the morale of Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobites.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]