Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

‘Cause for concern’: Aberdeen doctor urges pregnant women to get jab after mums-to-be admitted to hospital

Aberdeen doctor Vhairi Bateman is concerned about the health of pregnant women with Covid.
Aberdeen doctor Vhairi Bateman is concerned about the health of pregnant women with Covid.

A doctor has voiced concerns over the number of pregnant women admitted to hospital with coronavirus.

Dr Vhairi Bateman, who works on the infectious disease ward at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, said mums-to-be were now being treated at the city hospital.

Why are medics so worried?

“The health of the mums is really giving us cause for concern,” Dr Bateman said.

“With society opening up more people of child-bearing age can have quite a lot of contacts. If they’ve got other children they might be out and about doing things taking their kids to various activities.

Mums are given advice at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary on how to keep babies safe from Covid.

“And when Covid is circulating at a high level in the community, unfortunately, the more contacts you have the more likely you are to come into contact with someone who is carrying the virus, either with, or without, symptoms.”

What are the main concerns for newborn babies?

The consultant said the virus caused further complications for new mums diagnosed  because of the need to self-isolate with their babies at home.

“Generally the babies are not experiencing Covid infections and the advice is given to all mums on how to prevent transmission to their baby,” she said.

“When you’ve got a young baby to look after, even if you’re not seriously, or critically unwell, having to self-isolate and go through all those other problems does cause quite a lot of issues.

Pregnant women are being encouraged to get the Covid vaccine.

“One of the things we would like to highlight to people is that there has been a change in advice and the Scottish Government is now encouraging the vaccination of pregnant women.”

How much of a gap should mums-to-be leave between the two vaccines?

A new study is being launched to work out the best gap with more than 600 women being recruited for the trial.

Pregnant women aged 18 to 44 will be recruited and will randomly receive one of the vaccines either at a four to six week dosing gap or the longer eight to 12 week dosing gap.

Researchers will monitor the vaccine’s effectiveness and follow the development of children after they are born up to when they are one year old.

The launch comes less than a week after research revealed the vast majority of pregnant women admitted to hospital with Covid-19 are unvaccinated.

Researchers at Oxford University described findings of their work as “concerning”, saying that one in 10 pregnant women in hospital with symptoms of Covid-19 often require intensive care.

An researcher at the Jenner Institute working on the coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University.
Research has been carried out at Oxford University.

Those behind this latest Preg-CoV trial said while there are currently no safety concerns when it comes to pregnant women having Covid-19 jabs, they hope it will give expectant mothers “the highest quality of data about these vaccines”.

The trial involves £7.5 million of UK Government funding and is being led by St George’s, University of London.

‘The vaccine uptake in pregnant women is disappointing’

Professor Paul Heath, chief investigator and professor of paediatric infectious diseases at St George’s, said: “The coverage (uptake) of vaccination in pregnancy at the moment is disappointing, it’s low, less than a third.

He said he hoped a lesson to be learned from this pandemic is “the need for including pregnant women in vaccine trials at an earlier stage”.

We feel comfortable with the safety of these vaccines. What we want to understand now is how to fine-tune them, to understand better how they work.

Dr Pat O’Brien, vice president at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

 

‘No pregnant woman with two jabs has required hospitalisation’

Dr Pat O’Brien, vice president at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said the findings of the study are likely to be relevant “for many years to come”.

He said: “This is an important study. We feel comfortable with the safety of these vaccines. What we want to understand now is how to fine-tune them, to understand better how they work. What’s the optimal way of giving them?

“Bear in mind this pandemic is likely to become endemic, this is likely to be ongoing. So I suspect that the findings from this trial will be relevant to us, to pregnant women for many years to come.”

Vaccines minister Nadhim Zahawi wants to protect pregnant woman and their babies.

Vaccines minister Nadhim Zahawi said: “Pregnant women are more likely to get seriously ill from Covid-19 and we know that vaccines are safe for them and make a huge difference – in fact no pregnant woman with two jabs has required hospitalisation with Covid-19.

“This Government-backed trial will provide more data about how we can best protect pregnant women and their babies, and we can use this evidence to inform future vaccination programmes.”

 


More stories from our Health & Wellbeing team:

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]