Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Plans to demolish Aberdeen Market for redevelopment approved by councillors

An artist's impression of the building, viewed from Market Street, which is planned for the Aberdeen Market site.
An artist's impression of the building, viewed from Market Street, which is planned for the Aberdeen Market site.

Plans to demolish the Aberdeen Market to make way for an 11-storey office building have moved forward, having gained the conditional backing of city councillors.

At a meeting yesterday, detailed plans were considered for the Market Street site, currently home to a number of small, independent retailers.

Patrizia’s office-led “lantern-shaped” glass and granite development would increase from five-storeys-tall in Market Street to 11-storeys – or 187-ft-tall – at the other end of the development, near Carmelite Street.

But new building would have less of a footprint in The Green however, reclaiming space for public use.

The development would include offices, retail space, a business lounge, cafes, and 126 car parking spaces.

Yesterday councillors voted to approve the plans, dependent on Patrizia signing a legal agreement to meet 27 conditions.

Those include ensuring the provision of money towards paths and a car club vehicle, the inclusion of electric vehicle charging points, as well as the provision of a new public plaza in The Green.

Patrizia had previously secured planning permission to redevelop the adjoining former BHS building in Union Street into office space, shops and apartments.

Last night Patrizia’s Shaun Hose told The P&J the decision was “very welcome”, after four years work on the proposals.

“We will continue to work closely with Aberdeen City Council and other stakeholders to deliver on our proposals which will inject new vibrancy into this part of the city centre,” he added.

Planning convener Marie Boulton moved the motion to approve the plans conditionally, telling the meeting, held by video call: “Design is always difficult and it is recognised that there was a lot of to-ing and fro-ing with the applicant to make sure the building isn’t as dense and is set back at various points.

“I think the use of glass and granite will allow it to blend in with and reflect the buildings around it.

She added: “There will be a significant impact down in The Green but we have heard that will be compensated with all the activity that will take place there.

“The plans will make more space on The Green, an area we have seen come back into its own as a destination with things like Nu Art – and with a wider footprint this will escalate.”

Liberal Democrat Martin Greig was the only councillor to speak out against the plans during yesterday’s meeting.

The Hazlehead, Queen’s Cross and Countesswells member branded it an “enormous monstrosity”.

He warned: “It will seriously reduce the quality and environment of the area; The Green in particular will be dramatically affected.

“We have a duty to protect the special character of our city centre and this is just another example of over development with yet another undesirable skyscraper.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]