Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

‘Shameful behaviour’: Pilgrimage site for Outlander fans at Culloden battlefield reportedly vandalised

Leanach Cottage at Culloden Battlefield has a broken window. Picture by Duncan Macpherson.
Leanach Cottage at Culloden Battlefield has a broken window. Picture by Duncan Macpherson.

Leanach Cottage on Culloden Battlefield which has become a pilgrimage site for Outlander fans has been vandalised.

The historic building, used as a field hospital during the Battle of Culloden, has had a window smashed.

The alleged act of vandalism has been described as “shameful behaviour” by the area’s councillor.

Councillor Duncan Macpherson, who represents Inverness South ward, saw the damage while out on a walk at the weekend.

The Culloden cottage is a huge draw for Outlander fans

Leanach Cottage at Culloden is high on the list for Outlander fans, as one of the few buildings still standing from the period in which the popular TV series and books are set.

Mr Macpherson says he has reported the damage to the police and owners, the National Trust for Scotland (NTS).

Leanach Cottage at Culloden Battlefield has a broken glass window. Picture by Duncan Macpherson.

He did not know when the window was broken, but said it must have been fairly recently.

The building, dating from the early 18th century was the infirmary for wounded and dying following the historic battle in April 1746, and is by far the oldest building in the area.

Mr Macpherson was shocked to find the damage at the cottage. He describes the thatched building as one of the most “iconic” in the north of Scotland.

He said: “As one of the Inverness South Highland councillors whose ward covers Culloden Battlefield, I was bitterly disappointed to see this damage to Leanach Cottage.

“The cottage has a broken glass window in what appears to have been a stone thrown in an apparent act of vandalism.

“If it is, as it appears, then it is shameful behaviour by the culprit, to desecrate one of our country’s most famous landmarks in this way.”

Mr Macpherson has reported the matter to the police. Police have been contacted to comment.

Why is Leanach Cottage so special?

The National Trust for Scotland was gifted Leanach Cottage in 1944 by Hector Forbes, the local land owner.

Leanach Cottage at Culloden Battlefield has a broken glass window. Picture by Duncan Macpherson.

The cottage became the original visitor centre in 1961.

Historical maps show a number of farmsteads in the close vicinity of the battlefield with small pockets of individually cultivated land, however, Leanach is now one of the only surviving examples of this landscape.

The cottage itself was likely constructed in the early 18th century, probably as part of wider improvements on Culloden estate and originally would have been a T-shaped structure.

In the 17th and 18th century estate owners provided their tenants with the wood for their roof crucks whilst the tenant was responsible for the construction of the walls of their houses.

A MacDonald was the last resident of Leanach Cottage

During the Battle of Culloden Leanach Cottage was situated in between the government lines.

It is likely the building would have been used as a field hospital for the government men.

The last occupant of Leanach Cottage was Belle MacDonald who lived here until she died in 1912.

Her family reportedly gave tours of the battlefield to interested visitors.

In 1924 the Gaelic Society of Inverness set out to repair and conserve the building and the original steeply pitched roof was replaced with a shallower one.

The National Trust for Scotland has been invited to comment.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]