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Massive Archimedes screws delivered to Inverness building site as part of River Ness hydro project

One of the two giant Archimedes Screws delivered to the site on the banks of the River Ness.

Highland Council has taken delivery of two key components of the new River Ness hydro project currently underway in Inverness.

Workers prepared two massive Archimedes screws which will form a major part of the new hydroelectric generator on the River Ness.

The building sites sits on the banks of the river just south of the Ness islands and next to the Holm Mills bridge.

When finished, the site will also have a visitor centre which will have interactive elements teaching visitors about hydropower.

The Archimedes screws will be used to harness the powerful currents of the River Ness to generate electricity for homes and businesses in Inverness.

The main themes of the project are sustainability, renewable energy, climate change and stem learning.

Hydro project will contribute to climate change goals

However, there has been some controversy over the project due to a large amount of silt deposited into the River Ness from the building site in July 2021.

This caused the river to become cloudy and local anglers were concerned about the impact on juvenile fish in the river.

The project, due for completion in spring 2022, is expected to generate approximately 550,000 kWh of renewable electricity annually and reduce carbon emissions by over 140,000kg per year.

The screws will be used to generate hydroelectric power for homes and businesses in Inverness as part of the Council’s climate change agenda.

Nearby venues such as the leisure centre are to benefit from the clean energy generated from the massive turbines.

School children in Inverness are being asked to design a poster and name for the building when it is completed.

Chairman of Highland Council’s education committee, John Finlayson, is encouraging schools to take part.

He said: “This exciting new hydro project will serve as a flagship for the Highland Council’s response to climate change and will be operating for many years to come so we are looking to our young people to get creative.

“It is quite a challenge to find a fitting name and poster design that captures the essence of this ambitious project, but I have every confidence in the talents of our pupils.”

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