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Readers’ letters: Can ‘animal lovers’ allow horse deaths?

Grand National Festival 2022 at Aintree Racecourse, Liverpool. Picture date: Saturday April 9, 2022. Steven Paston/PA Wire
Grand National Festival 2022 at Aintree Racecourse, Liverpool. Picture date: Saturday April 9, 2022. Steven Paston/PA Wire

Sir, – Thank you Neil Drysdale for the excellent article on the death of horses at Aintree this year.

I didn’t watch the race but there seemed to be very little mention of the deaths in the media.

If another country held a festival where animals die as part of the “entertainment”, we would call it barbaric.

As he suggests, thought has to be given to things like the height of the jumps, the number of riders and the use of whips.

If we really are a nation of “animal lovers”, horse racing with jumps would be banned altogether.

Charlie Scott, New Pitsligo, Aberdeenshire.

PM said sorry, now let’s forget about it

Sir, – Now that the prime minister and chancellor have apologised and paid their fines there should be a line drawn under the “Partygate” affair.

It was hardly surprising that Nicola Sturgeon was one of the first to call for their resignations but if memory serves she was seen maskless at a wake in December 2020 when face coverings were a legal requirement in Scotland.

Also, there were calls for her to resign over misleading the Scottish Parliament but she did not quit.

The public are right to be annoyed at the prime minister and chancellor but I’m sure if people examined their own behaviour over the pandemic period we would find that many have broken the rules.

It might not be that an individual has attended a party but they may have not have worn a mask where required, they may have gone into someone’s house, had someone in their own house or turned a blind eye at a neighbour having visitors to their house. These are all situations where individuals will have bent the rules to suit their own needs, they were just not caught.

The prime minister is the right man to be leading the country and has shown great leadership during the troubles in Ukraine.

Likewise, the chancellor is the man with the skills to be in charge at the Treasury. Many livelihoods were saved by his financial support.

Now is not the time for both to be leaving Downing Street. If this were to happen the only winner would be Vladimir Putin.

Mhairi E Rennie, Finlayson Street, Fraserburgh.

Harvie should try cycling on the A96

Sir, – It has recently been well publicised that Patrick Harvie, co-leader of the Green Party and Minister of Zero Carbon Buildings, Active Travel and Tenants’ Rights (who invented such a title?), has been a strong advocate against dualling the A96, which defies the belief of users of such a dangerous stretch of road.

We should remember that this is the same Mr Harvie who was photographed on his bicycle, minus helmet, going the wrong way up a one-way street in Edinburgh.

Perhaps, with suitable headgear and a visit to Specsavers, he should make an attempt on the A96!

John Reid, Regent Court, Keith.

Good mums know about nutrition

Sir, – So they needed a university study (probably costing a packet) to tell them what any sensible mother could have told them to start with.

It stands to reason that if the mother is undernourished, then the baby will be too.

Also, if that baby continues to be undernourished then its immune system will also be unable to fight off illnesses.

Frances S Jaffray, Modley House, Ellon, Aberdeenshire.

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