Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Public spending is almost £1,500 higher in Scotland than elsewhere in the UK

David Mundell said the figures prove Scotland benefits from the "broad-shoulders" of the UK
David Mundell said the figures prove Scotland benefits from the "broad-shoulders" of the UK

Public spending in Scotland is almost £1,500 per head higher than the UK average.

New figures from the UK Treasury show that the average spend per person north of the border is £10,536 a year – compared to a nationwide average of £9,076.

Secretary of State for Scotland David Mundell said the figures highlighted the benefits of being part of a “broad-shouldered” United Kingdom.

But the Scottish Government suggested the figures “demonstrate” its commitment to public services, adding that they “only describe one side of the equation”.

The UK-wide vote to leave the EU in June has raised the spectre of a second referendum on Scottish independence.

Voters north of the border backed remaining in the continental block, while England and Wales voted to leave.

After the result, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon suggested a second plebiscite was “highly likely”.

But Mr Mundell suggested the UK Treasury figures published yesterday showed Scotland’s public finances benefited from being part of the UK.

He said: “Public spending in Scotland is higher than the rest of the UK – now by almost £1,500 per person per year – despite a rising budget deficit on the Scottish Government’s watch.

“This illustrates the value to Scotland of being part of a strong, broad-shouldered United Kingdom.”

According to the UK Treasury, the average government spend per head in Scotland was £10,536 in 2015/16.

Northern Ireland enjoyed the highest spend per head in the same year – £10,938 – while England received the lowest, with £8,816 spent per person.

Scottish Labour’s Westminster spokesman Ian Murray MP said: “These figures confirm that being part of the UK means there is more money to spend on public services like schools and the NHS in Scotland.

“Even the SNP’s own numbers show that leaving the UK would mean spending cuts and tax rises worth at least £15 billion a year over and above those already being imposed by the Tories.

“Independence would put at risk the life chances of future generations of Scots.”

A spokesman for the Scottish Government said: “(These figures) demonstrate the Scottish Government’s commitment to invest in front line public services.

“They show that spending on education in Scotland increased by 3.7% over the past year compared to a 2% fall across the UK. Likewise, health spending in Scotland increased by 4.6% in the year to March 2016 compared to growth of 3.4% across the UK.

“Of course, these figures only describe one side of the equation when it comes to public finances – with no comparison for public sector revenues. Scottish revenue has been on average £630 per person a year higher than in the UK as a whole since devolution (1999-00).”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]

More from the Press and Journal Scottish politics team

More from the Press and Journal