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Good Morning Britain interrupted by singing protester

Susanna Reid was presenting Good Morning Britain from Westminster when the broadcast was interrupted by a singing protester (Ian West/PA)
Susanna Reid was presenting Good Morning Britain from Westminster when the broadcast was interrupted by a singing protester (Ian West/PA)

Good Morning Britain faced a minor interruption during a live broadcast when a protester began belting out a modified rendition of Bye Bye Baby outside the Houses of Parliament.

GMB presenters Susanna Reid and Ed Balls were hosting the ITV breakfast news show live from Westminster when activist Steve Bray began singing “Bye bye Boris”, a parody tune written by Somerled MacKay.

Reid, 51, and Balls, 55, noticed Bray’s karaoke while reporting on the recent barrage of resignations by Cabinet members and MPs, which have added to the mounting pressure on the Prime Minister.

Reid appeared distracted as the 53-year-old started singing, and asked: “Oh what’s… Sorry, where’s that come from?”

Balls replied: “I don’t know.”

Reid continued: “Are we about to do karaoke?” before realising it was Bray.

Bray, from Port Talbot in South Wales, made frequent protests against Brexit on College Green throughout 2018 and 2019 and has previously been heard shouting during TV news broadcasts.

He is also known for walking into the background of live TV reports, often wearing his eye-catching top hat and carrying placards with anti-Brexit or anti-Government messages.

Mr Bray told the PA news agency: “People love to hear it… I did notice Ed Balls dancing.

“It’s wearing thin on me now but I just keep putting it on… It’s a tune that, when I start, I can’t get it out of my head, even when I go to bed.

“I prefer the Somerled version because we can all relate to the lyrics better.”

Mr Bray said watching resignations pour out of Downing Street has been “gold”.

“Yesterday was gold, so gold,” he said.

“I got here for seven o’clock so I’ve had about three-and-a-half hours’ sleep, but it’s worth every second.

“They’re falling like flies at the moment. Boris is finished.

“(And) I’m here to show people that we don’t have to accept what they say without a fight.”

Reid quickly recognised the performer, saying: “Oh, it’s Steve Bray! It’s the latest Steve Bray protest, isn’t it?”

Despite the interruption, both presenters seemed to be entertained by the inventive performance.

“Oh, come on, Steve,” said Balls.

Reid added: “Well, I suppose if you’re no longer allowed to shout, there are other ways of making your voice heard.”

– Good Morning Britain airs on ITV every weekday from 6am.

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