Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Arable farmers urged to exercise caution when selling carbon

Arable Scotland took place at Balruddery Farm on the outskirts of Dundee.
Arable Scotland took place at Balruddery Farm on the outskirts of Dundee.

Arable farmers are being urged to use caution when thinking about selling the carbon stored in their soils.

Jon Foot from the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) made the comments at a press briefing at the Arable Scotland event at Balruddery Farm on the outskirts of Dundee.

Dr Foot, who is head of environment and resource management at the levy body, said the carbon market presented opportunities for farmers in the form of them being able to build up the carbon stocks in their soils.

However, he urged caution when looking at selling these stocks off and said: “I would be very careful about selling carbon and would advise, in all cases before entering into any carbon scheme, that the farmer seeks professional advice.

“You don’t want to be selling your carbon straight away because there is the risk down the road that your customer says you need to achieve net-zero, and if you have sold your carbon cheap you may have to buy it back more expensively.”

Many farmers are being approached to sell their carbon as part of the drive to net-zero.

Dr Ken Loades from the James Hutton Institute acknowledged there were many different carbon calculators on the market for farmers to use, which in many cases offered different carbon footprint answers for the same farm.

However, he urged farmers to choose one to use and to stick with it so that they can monitor any progress they make in reducing the emissions from their farms.

Dr Loades added: “There needs to be caution that farmers don’t use a different calculator to change their numbers.”

He encouraged growers to start their carbon calculations journey by engaging with the Scottish Government’s £51 million National Test Programme (NTP) – designed to prepare farmers and crofters for future farm policy.

The first phase of the programme, announced earlier this year, offers support for carbon audits and soil analysis.

Dr Loades said: “Farmers should be really starting to make the most of the testing they can do that will be subsidised by the Scottish Government; it’s important because any payments linked to carbon in the future will be assured.

“We need the industry to be committed to this [NTP] because this is what will be happening in the future.”

Oxford Farming Conference: UK land-based carbon credits worth £1.7bn

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]

Conversation

[[title_reg]]

Please enter the name you would like to appear on your comments. (It doesn’t have to be your real name - but nothing rude please, we are a polite bunch!) Use a combination of eight or more characters that includes an upper and lower case character, and a number.

By registering with [[site_name]] you agree to our Terms and Conditions and our Privacy Policy

Or sign up with

Facebook Google

[[content_reg_complete]]

[[title_login]]

Or login with

Forgotten your password? Reset it

[[title]]