Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Keep mince pies away from dogs to avoid an emergency vet trip this Christmas – just like this family

The Bruce family had to take an emergency trip to the vet on Christmas Eve after Barley ate a mince pie
The Bruce family had to take an emergency trip to the vet on Christmas Eve after Barley ate a mince pie

Just one bite of a mince pie – or any festive treat containing raisins and sultanas – could be fatal for your dog this Christmas.

Press and Journal reporter Lindsay Bruce found this out the hard way when her seven-month-old Labrador retriever Barley scoffed the treat left out for Santa.

Knowing grapes were bad for dogs the family sought advice online and were horrified to discover how serious it could become for their puppy.

Lindsay with her seven-month-old Labrador retriever, Barley

According to Vets Now both grapes and raisins are toxic to dogs and can lead to acute kidney failure or even death.

The website added that while all forms of grapes are bad for dogs, it’s thought the dried versions of the fruits are more likely to cause severe symptoms if eaten by your dog.

For the Bruce family it meant an emergency trip to the vet near midnight on Christmas Eve resulting in a huge vet bill to ensure Barley’s wellbeing.

Lindsay said: “He had to have a special injection to make him vomit, charcoal medicine to use in the coming days and we even discussed keeping him in for fluids which would have cost thousands more.”

Lindsay’s niece Emily with Barley

Christmas food is particularly dangerous because of all the dried fruit.

Items like stollen, Christmas puds and clootie dumpling are the main offenders.

Vets Now said: “Our vets have seen emergency cases when just one grape has been eaten but in other cases, a handful may cause no symptoms.

“That’s why it’s best to always best err on the side of caution and contact your vet or your nearest emergency vet if your dog has eaten a grape.”


Lindsay Bruce is a journalist, author and speaker

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]