Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Donations to RAF Lossiemouth keep historic aircraftman’s legacy alive

Possessions belonging to an aircraftman who worked on the famous ‘Sir Roderic’ Hawker Hurricane have been donated.
Possessions belonging to an aircraftman who worked on the famous ‘Sir Roderic’ Hawker Hurricane have been donated.

Artefacts belonging to an aircraftman who worked on a famous RAF fighter jet have been donated to RAF Lossiemouth.

Lawrence Raymond Eagles served as a fitter during the Second World War and played a part in preparing the original Hawker Hurricane, named Sir Roderic, for battle.

The story of this famous aircraft dates back to the 1930s and the MacRobert family of Aberdeenshire whose support of the war effort launched generations of fighter planes into the skies.

Lady Rachel MacRobert and Sir Alexander MacRobert had three sons: their eldest, Alasdair, was killed in a civil flying accident in 1938 while Roderic and Iain were both pilots in the RAF and died while flying sorties during the war.

It was due to these deaths that Lady MacRobert donated £25,000 to the RAF to buy a Stirling bomber, which was named MacRobert’s Reply.


>> Keep up to date with the latest news with The P&J newsletter


The plane was part of XV Squadron’s fleet and the name was given to subsequent aircraft so it could remain a fixture of that fleet until the Squadron disbanded in 2017.

Lady MacRobert continued to support the war effort after the initial donation, gifting another £20,000 to the RAF to enable it to buy four Hurricane fighters.

Three were named after her sons while the fourth bore her own name.

Following the disbandment of XV Squadron it was decided that the MacRobert connection with the RAF would remain at Lossiemouth and so a Typhoon jet on 6 Squadron was named ‘Sir Roderic’.

Mr Eagles worked with Sir Roderic MacRobert during the Second World War and it was this connection that led Lady MacRobert to send him a letter of thanks after he wrote to her following her son’s death.

The children of Mr Eagles, James Eagle and Catherine Lane, donated that personal letter, their father’s war time photo album, a 94 Squadron badge, a limited edition print of the four MacRobert fighters, and a special edition bottle of whisky to RAF Lossiemouth.

Scots-based Typhoon fast jet renamed ‘Sir Roderic’.

They visited the base – home of the current Sir Roderic aircraft – to present the items for display.

Sergeant John Le Hequet received the artefacts and said: “We’re extremely grateful to receive these personal items from Mr Eagles and Mrs Lane in memory of their late father, Lawrence.

“We’ll use them to ensure that the legacy of the MacRoberts fighters is remembered and told to future generations.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]