Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Man, 65, weighed just 4.5stone when he died

Post Thumbnail

A 65-year-old man with mental health problems weighed just 4.5stone when he died in hospital after refusing food, drink and medical treatment, according to a new report.

An investigation by the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland found that “opportunities were missed” to give him “as comfortable and dignified a death as possible”.

The commission’s report was heavily critical of those responsible for looking after the man before his death in May 2012.

It states that the man, who has not been named, lived in a “remote area of Scotland”, however, the commission would not name the GP practice, NHS board or local authority involved.

The man who was named only Mr JL in the report, is described as suffering from “cognitive difficulties and significant communication difficulties” and having “a history of depression”.

The report states that he repeatedly refused medical examination and treatment and food and drink and, on admission to hospital, was found to weigh just 4.5stone.

But the commission was concerned that he may not have been capable of consenting to or refusing medical treatment.

A postmortem examination concluded that his death was due to pneumonia and cancer of the tongue and floor of the mouth.

The commission’s chief executive, Colin McKay, said: “Although a number of professionals were concerned about Mr JL’s wellbeing, they did not ensure that a proper assessment was made of his capacity to make such a major treatment decision.”

He added: “As a result, opportunities were missed to give Mr JL as comfortable and dignified a death as possible.”

The commission has made 17 recommendations to the care provider, local authority, the NHS board responsible for Mr JL’s care and treatment, Healthcare Improvement Scotland and the Scottish Government.

These include better training in incapacity legislation and more effective support for sole care workers, particularly where a service user may be at risk.

A Scottish Government spokesman said: “We accept the findings of the Mental Welfare Commission and will be working closely with the NHS board to help them implement the recommendations in full.”

And a spokesman for Healthcare Improvement Scotland said: “We have noted the recommendation made by the commission and will ensure that it informs our review of the national framework (for NHS Scotland).”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]