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Readers’ letters: Beergate was break for food

Labour leader Sir Keir is to be investigated by police amid allegations he broke lockdown rules last year. Picture by Kirsty O'Connor/PA Wire
Labour leader Sir Keir is to be investigated by police amid allegations he broke lockdown rules last year. Picture by Kirsty O'Connor/PA Wire

Keir Starmer, now facing an inquiry by Durham police after being spotted having a beer with colleagues during the Covid lockdown era, surely has no case to answer.

He, along with like-minded parliamentarians, was quite rightly engaged in campaigning to convince voters in the upcoming Hartlepool by-election to have no dealings with the party of the present occupier of 10 Downing Street, to them surely the most unworthy politician ever to hold this great office of state.

Hours spent in campaigning made those involved seek nourishment, and with the taverns closed during the pandemic, the group retired to a members’ office where welcome food and drink was delivered.

Although alternative beverages were available, Sir Keir found beer to be more lubricating to his vocal chords. This will resonate with the police accustomed to dealing with the fallout from pub closing time.

So the difference between “beergate” and “partygate” was the former allowed participants access to necessary sustenance while the latter an excuse for, well “a party”.

My own verdict on Sir Keir is not guilty – a decent man lacking the charisma to ever get the keys to No 10.

I W Reid, Laurencekirk.

Turnout appals

Having looked at the turnout to the local elections, I am appalled at the very low turnout of the people who were able to vote albeit by post or going to the election points.

The voters who could not be bothered voting did in fact allow the SNP to stay in power at Holyrood and I am very sure that this will not be welcomed by many voters in Scotland.

So, for the next few years, where will the SNP waste more of the taxpayers’ cash? Perhaps a shipyard or maybe an airport?

G Elder, Peterhead.

Scexit eclipsed

During the council election campaign, Nicola Sturgeon urged voters to “Send Boris a message” and opinion polls forecast an “astonishing” 44% vote share. In fact, the SNP got a 34% share of the vote. Only 641,000 – one in seven – of Scotland’s 4.3 million voters voted SNP.

Scotland’s “message to Boris” is: Scexit has been eclipsed by Covid, economic crisis and war, and dogged by SNP incompetence, scandals and cover-ups. It is running out of steam and into the buffers of voter anger and apathy.

A Sutherland, Stonehaven.

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