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Golfers can explore the history of acclaimed Aberdeenshire course at new museum

Cruden Bay's championship course was designed by Old Tom Morris and Archie Simpson.
Cruden Bay's championship course was designed by Old Tom Morris and Archie Simpson.

Golfers at Cruden Bay will be able to step back in time before they tee off at the renowned links thanks to the addition of a new museum charting the history of the club and course.

The club has converted The Old Clubhouse, a Grade 2 listed building which has been a focal point at the first tee since 1899, into a museum and starter’s box with the help of the Port Errol Heritage Group.

Cruden Bay’s general manager Les Durno believes the new facility will be a popular addition.

Durno said: “It should have opened last March.

“It all came about after the Port Errol Heritage Group put on a display in the village hall and we provided some extra information.

“We hadn’t seen a lot of the pictures before so we are really appreciative of what they did.

Inside Cruden Bay’s new golf museum.

“Members have handed in golf clubs, golf balls and other memorabilia.

“If Port Errol Heritage Group hadn’t done the initial display this wouldn’t have happened.

“It has taken a lot of work, particularly from our vice-captain Ali Strachan, and the feedback from members has been really positive.

“There is a lot of interesting bits of history from 1899 onwards and it looks fantastic.”

The club invited their four longest serving members to officially open the museum – Elma Morgan (a member since 1940), May Matthews (1948), Ian Mackintosh (1949) and Harold Duncan (1956).

Long-serving Cruden Bay members (from left) Harold Duncan, Elma Morgan, May Matthews and Ian Mackintosh cut the ribbon.

Elma and Ian’s father John G Mackintosh was the club secretary and treasurer from 1954 to 1971.

Over the years, the building has been used as a clubhouse, a shop and locker rooms, a junior room with table tennis and snooker tables, and as a starter’s hut and putting studio.

Lisa Shearer from Port Errol Heritage Group unveiled a plaque to mark the project.

Durno hopes the new facility will be well received by visitors when they travel to the widely-acclaimed links course, designed by Old Tom Morris and Archie Simpson.

He added: “The doors will be open, the starter will be there and players will be able to see all of this history.

“We are starting to get more visitors from overseas and it looks like September is going to be quite busy, which is encouraging.

“Next year already looks like it is going to take off.”

 

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