Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Commercial property: Fast-growing ClearWell relocates to bigger premises in Aberdeen

ClearWell Energy CEO Keith Coutts with the company's in-demand technology.
ClearWell Energy CEO Keith Coutts with the company's in-demand technology.

Energy technology firm ClearWell, of Aberdeen, has moved into larger premises, rebranded and made its debut in an overseas renewables market.

The company was until recently known as Clearwell Oilfield Solutions.

But it has changed its name to ClearWell Energy, saying the new moniker is to “better reflect its market position and ambitious growth strategy”.

The rebrand is in step with a raft of other firms, as well as industry organisations such as Oil and Gas UK and the Oil and Gas Authority (now Offshore Energies UK and North Sea Transition Authority respectively), that have ditched any reference to fossil fuels in their names.

ClearWell said it had also entered the geothermal energy market for the first time.

In February it installed technology for a utility company at a geothermal power station in Germany.

Entering the renewable energy market presents an exciting opportunity for business growth, with an estimated 400 suitable geothermal power and heat facilities that we could be supporting in Europe alone.”

Keith Coutts, chief executive, ClearWell Energy.

The company has grown its Aberdeen headcount to 13 people from just three at the end of 2019.

Meanwhile, it has more than quadrupled its footprint in Dyce after a move to larger premises of around 3,500sq ft in South Wellheads Industrial Estate.

It was previously based in 800sq ft of FrontRow Energy Technology Group’s incubator facility on Wellheads Crescent.

The firm said it had also added new manufacturing and testing facilities, and was continuing to invest in “ongoing” research and development.

Recent expansion has been driven by growing demand for ClearWell’s chemical-free, electromagnetic scale control technology, despite the challenges of Covid-19, the company said.

Revenue for 2022 is expected to come in at around £3 million, up from £2.1m last year.

Novel approach to reducing scale

The firm’s technology uses a low frequency electromagnetic signal to inhibit mineral scale formation in “wet” infrastructure such as wells, pipelines, processing facilities and storage tanks.

It is also designed to protect expensive internal components, such as pumps and valves, from failure.

According to ClearWell, the technology can replace traditional approaches, such as continuous injection of bulk chemical inhibitors and acid washes, to deliver “impressive flow assurance”.

Balanced portfolio

Chief executive Keith Coutts said: “Entering the renewable energy market presents an exciting opportunity for business growth, with an estimated 400 suitable geothermal power and heat facilities that we could be supporting in Europe alone.

“Applying our skills and technology will improve geothermal efficiency for asset owners, but also provide our business with a balanced energy portfolio and opportunity to improve our carbon offset.”

The geothermal power station in Germany.

The European renewables market is an ideal springboard for the firm’s global growth ambitions, Mr Coutts said, adding: “ClearWell technology is eminently suited to geothermal applications because variations in temperature, pressure, flow and liquid states are common – and act as key contributing factors in the formation of scale.

“The use of chemical treatments is often prohibited in this sector, so with its environmentally friendly credentials, ClearWell is a valuable flow assurance solution.”

Jointly owned by MSL and FrontRow

ClearWell has UK offices in Aberdeen and Southampton, and an overseas presence in the US and Canada.

The company has installed more than 250 of its non-invasive, chemical-free, scale control systems to clients across Europe, Africa, the Americas, Asia and Australasia.

It is jointly owned by Hampshire firm MSL Oilfield Services and FrontRow Energy Technology Group, the Aberdeen-based investment consortium focused on nurturing new technology to deliver practical solutions to global oil and gas sector challenges.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]