Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Video: Green hydrogen shaping Highlands’ future

H2 Green managing director Luke Johnson and Highland Council leader Margaret Davidson seal the deal on a hydrogen "hub" in Inverness.
H2 Green managing director Luke Johnson and Highland Council leader Margaret Davidson seal the deal on a hydrogen "hub" in Inverness.

Nearly two-thirds of a £375 million UK Government funding package for innovative technologies to strengthen Britain’s energy security will support hydrogen production.

The £240m Net Zero Hydrogen Fund is intended to boost hydrogen projects to deliver clean energy.

It is also expected to advance the government’s ambition to have up to two gigawatts (GW) of low-carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2025 and up to 10GW installed by 2030.

Momentum is building to scale up green hydrogen production, with government support complemented by substantial private investment.

While some of the impetus is fuelled by concerns about long-term demand for oil products, there is growing recognition that increasing the cost effectiveness of renewables can smooth the process of energy transition.

Green hydrogen developer H2 Green is poised to decarbonise commercial transport systems through a network of “hubs”, with Inverness chosen as a strategic first location in Scotland, supporting jobs and the local economy.

The rural aspect of the Highlands lends itself to green hydrogen as the most cost-effective, clean fuel solution for rail and commercial transport.”

Luke Johnson, managing director, H2 Green.

Unlike other forms of the gas, green hydrogen is produced by splitting water through electrolysis – using only renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, to create a clean, odourless fuel.

Edinburgh-based H2 Green – part of Getech Group, with operations in Leeds, London and Houston, in the US – has signed an agreement with Highland Council to establish a “world-class” green hydrogen network across the north.

The site in Inverness is expected to produce up to eight tonnes of hydrogen every day.

H2 Green is developing the production and storage facility on SGN’s old gas holder site in the Highland capital – and believes it will be a catalyst for fundamental change.

Ian Spencer, head of business development, H2 Green, at the site of the proposed hydrogen “hub” in Inverness.

The project will see Inverness become one of the first cities in the UK to establish commercial production of green hydrogen, helping the wider Highlands to play a leading role in the transition to zero carbon fuel.

H2 Green’s plan is to build production, storage and delivery infrastructure at “optimal” sites across the Highlands, and establish commercial agreements for green hydrogen and by-products, such as zero-emission heat.

Green hydrogen is seen as an attractive source of energy for carbon-free rail transport on hard to electrify tracks.

Train operator Eversholt Rail teamed up with H2 Green to develop hydrogen supply solutions, particularly on rail routes where electrification is not technically or economically viable.

One of the key advantages hydrogen is said to offer the transport sector is the refuelling process.

According to H2 Green, it takes only minutes -unlike electric vehicle charging, which usually needs hours.

This is seen as particularly important for busy commercial fleets, such as refuse lorries, buses and trucks.

Highlands ‘perfect’ for hydrogen

H2 Green managing director Luke Johnson said the Highlands were the perfect location for the production of green hydrogen.

He added: “Abundance of natural resources is crucial. The Highland region has a strong competitive advantage in being able to produce green hydrogen from readily available renewable energy sources, particularly offshore wind.

“Hydrogen also addresses the intermittent nature of wind production. Electricity generation can be matched with demand, with hydrogen’s storage capabilities solving the problem of gaps in supply.

Luke Johnson.

“Furthermore, the rural aspect of the Highlands lends itself to green hydrogen as the most cost-effective, clean fuel solution for rail and commercial transport.

“There’s a substantial global market emerging for green hydrogen in heavy transport.

Hydrogen buses are already a common sight on streets around the world, and other sectors such as rail and logistics will follow.”

One of Aberdeen’s world-first hydrogen double-decker buses.

Mr Johnson continued: “Our vision is to create a network of green hydrogen hubs which will not only remove transport emissions, but also create jobs, support the supply chain and help decarbonise wider sectors such as the whisky industry.

“The hydrogen generation can even provide zero-carbon heat and medical-grade oxygen for hospitals and aquaculture, as well as for water treatment works in the area.”

Mr Johnson said one of the most exciting aspects of developing the new hydrogen network was the “huge potential” to support economic growth in the Highlands and provide a sustainable revenue stream that will support the energy transition from oil and gas into renewables in a meaningful way, helping to create and preserve jobs.

He added: “Sweden and Germany scaled up investment in wind in the ‘90s which put them ahead of the global renewables race for decades to come, while Scotland lost out on much of the potential.

“We want to create the green hydrogen infrastructure economy here from the get-go.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]