Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

At least 220,000 women will have died waiting for compensation for state pension bungle

A Waspi (Women Against State Pension Inequality) protest in London in 2017.
A Waspi (Women Against State Pension Inequality) protest in London in 2017.

A north-east MSP has said it is “appalling but sadly not surprising” more than 220,000 women in the UK will have died waiting for pension compensation by the end of this year.

Research shows 220,190 women will have died in the seven years since a campaign started to get women born in the 1950s compensation for failures to inform them about the pension age changing from 60 to 66.

The study was carried out by research firm Statista on behalf of Women Against State Pension Inequality (Waspi).

The chancellor is effectively banking on the grim reaper saving him more and more money each year.”

Angela Madden, Waspi spokeswoman.

Waspi groups were set up throughout the UK to battle for compensation after changes to the pension age.

Statista’s figures show the UK Government has saved £3.8 billion in compensation likely to be awarded to those affected, by allowing women to die waiting for what they are owed.

Maladministration

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) has already found the Department for Work and Pensions guilty of maladministration, and is now investigating the harm caused.

Changes to the state pension age were legislated for in 1995 but not communicated to the affected women until 2008, leading the PHSO to find “the opportunity that additional notice would have given them to adjust their retirement plans was lost”.

Despite the Ombudsman’s findings and the death rate of those affected, the government is waiting for more reports before taking any action.

Women born in the 1950’s take a ‘battle bus’ to protest outside Parliament in 2018.

Waspi campaigners are demanding an immediate one-off compensation payment of between £11,666 and £20,000, with the most going to women who were given the shortest notice of the longest increase in their state pension age.

“The government’s strategy of delaying inevitable compensation payments is a cynical attempt to time women out of what they are due,” said Waspi spokeswoman Angela Madden.

‘Agony for millions of women’

She added: “The chancellor is effectively banking on the grim reaper saving him more and more money each year, leaving women struggling to pay their bills in retirement and lacking in trust in government.

“Since the Ombudsman has already found that women born in the 1950s were mistreated, the right thing to do is to put in place a compensation package right away.

“Doing so would end the agony for millions of women who have been emotionally, physically and financially affected by mistakes made in government.”

Gillian Martin MSP.

Aberdeenshire East SNP MSP Gillian Martin said:  “My office continues to see women affected by the shortfall in their pension be plunged into poverty.

“Many are having to try and find work despite not being physically able, and many cannot afford to pay their bills.

“What the UK Government has put these women through is unconscionable.

“The fact women are dying before seeing this issue resolved is appalling but sadly not surprising.”

‘Systematic shortcomings’

Conservative MP Peter Aldous, co-chairman of the all-party parliamentary group (APPG) for state pension inequality for women, said: “The so-called ‘Waspi’ women were victims of successive governments’ systemic shortcomings dating from 2005, maladministration and a failure to comply with the civil service code in their communications concerning the planned changes.

“The APPG that I co-chair has submitted evidence to the Ombudsman calling for the highest compensation level available in making its recommendations, which we feel should be paid to affected women in recognition of their suffering.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]