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Students’ relief as Aberdeen University agrees to take impact of pandemic into account when grading work

CR0020860

Aberdeen University Campus, Aberdeen University LOCATORS.


Picture by Scott Baxter    09/04/2020
CR0020860 Aberdeen University Campus, Aberdeen University LOCATORS. Picture by Scott Baxter 09/04/2020

Aberdeen University has agreed to take into account the impact of the pandemic when grading students’ work.

The university’s senate – responsible for academic matters relating to teaching and research – last month decided against a “no detriment” policy, which is designed to protect academics that have had their studies impeded by Covid.

Under such a policy, more flexibility would be provided when calculating final grades, giving markers the ability to take the effects of the virus on the academic’s work into account.

Aberdeen University Students Association (AUSA) launched a petition online appealing for the university to think again, and by Sunday evening had attracted in excess of 1,500 signatures.

Following back and forth conversations between students and the university senate, all learners’ grades will now be protected from the negative impacts of the pandemic.

Writing on social media, the Students for NDP group said: “We are so happy that the student body has been listened to.

“We would like to thank all of you that got involved, sharing our posts, supporting our petitions and open letter, and emailing your senators.

“This has shown the university is willing to help students through an extremely difficult and unusual time for everyone.

“Thank you to the staff who stood by this policy and supported students.

“We hope this new policy will make sure all students are equally supported in the pandemic.”

Having had to contend with unprecedented challenges to their studies due to the virus, many students will be glad of the news – feeling the policy gives them a “safety net” to fall back on.

Elected member of the university senate, Prof Amy Bryzgel added: “I am pleased that the senate was able to pass the revised safety net policy, ‘Protection from Disadvantage,’ presented on March 17.

“The policy had overwhelming support because it had gone through robust scrutiny during extensive meetings with staff over the last month, which helped bring it to a state where senators were happy to pass it.

“The university senate has always had the best interests of the students at heart.”

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