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10 positive things that social isolation has taught us

Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital join in a national applause during Thursday's nationwide Clap for Carers NHS initiative to applaud NHS workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic.
Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital join in a national applause during Thursday's nationwide Clap for Carers NHS initiative to applaud NHS workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic.

In every grey cloud, there is a silver lining.

If by now you’re feeling the effects of dealing with social isolation, you’re not alone.

It’s an environment most of us are not used to.

Here, Dr Elena Touroni, an experienced consultant psychologist, highlights shares her thoughts on the effects of social isolation, highlighting some of the positives we can learn from it.

1. It’s great to see the majority of us respecting social distancing guidelines to support the greater good

If you find yourself struggling, try standing in front of a mirror and saying to yourself that you are not alone, we are all going through this together.

It’s not permanent and by staying home you are keeping your loved ones safe.

Keep repeating until you feel your anxieties begin to ease.

2. Reports of local businesses experiencing surges of customers wanting to support them during this challenging time by purchasing fresh produce is a wonderful thing

3. An influx of fitness influencers have shared their tips for easy-to-follow exercise sessions to try at home

That’s made us become a lot more conscious of our physical wellbeing, which in turn is helping us to feel better at a time we need it more than ever.

4. The NHS and careers are receiving the recognition they deserve

Events such as the weekly #clapforcarers show the nation is coming together to proudly celebrate all the amazing people who are caring for those being treated with, and recovering from, the coronavirus.

5. Whether it’s supporting elderly and vulnerable neighbours, or making a conscious effort to say hello to those around you, communities are coming together and forming relationships which can have a positive impact when we’re missing friends and family 

6. It’s important that if you’re not self-isolating you get outside at least once a day to soak up different scenery. One thing the lockdown has taught us is to enjoy the great outdoors we have available to us, including all the nature we’d usually take for granted

7. We’re learning how to express ourselves creatively

Many of us are trying out a new creative hobby such as painting by numbers, colouring-in books and crochet, which are all perfect outlets to express and occupy ourselves.

8. At first, the thought of being home in joggers all day was welcomed by many

But without proper structure our moods can become affected.

Getting showered and dressed each day, as we would if life was normal, helps feel in control of the current situation and allows us to start our day off in a positive way.

9. With less transport on the roads and in the skies, there has been a marked decrease in smog, air pollution and CO2 levels across the globe.

We are all likely to come out of this experience having a newfound respect for our planet and understanding of how we can better support it for generations to come.

10. The current environment is challenging, not only because it’s constantly evolving, but also because coping is beyond anything we’ve ever had to deal with, which makes it an anxious time.

That’s why it’s great to see so many of us opening up about our feelings; talking helps sort ourselves and others out in the best way possible.

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