Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

As tributes are paid to Girls Aloud star Sarah Harding, these are 8 symptoms of breast cancer you shouldn’t ignore

Sarah Harding was diagnosed with breast cancer and fought hard. But the 39-year-old lost her battle with the disease.
Sarah Harding was diagnosed with breast cancer and fought hard. But the 39-year-old lost her battle with the disease.

Celebrities, fans and friends have flocked to social media to pay tribute to Girls Aloud singer Sarah Harding who passed away after battling breast cancer.

The 39-year-old star was diagnosed with cancer last year and publicly revealed she was fighting the illness, which had also spread to other parts of her body.

Tragically, Sarah lost her battle with breast cancer yesterday morning, as revealed by her mother Marie on Instagram.

The 8 most common symptoms of breast cancer you should never ignore

Breast cancer is currently the most common cancer in the UK, with one in eight women being diagnosed in their lifetime.

According to Cancer Research UK (CRUK), across Britain there are more than 55,000 new cases of breast cancer diagnosed every year – that’s around 150 per day.

A lump in your breast is a common sign of breast cancer, but there are more possible signs and symptoms of the disease, which should always be checked out by your doctor.

These are eight possible symptoms of breast cancer – although a person may have just one or all signs:

It’s important to note that not all breast lumps are linked to cancer, according to Macmillan Cancer Support.

Lumps in the breast could also be caused by cysts, however, any changes to a person’s breasts should still be checked out by a GP to rule out anything more serious.

What causes breast cancer?

The causes of breast cancer are unfortunately not fully understood, although there are some risk factors, which include:

Age

A patient having a mammogram which helps to diagnose breast cancer.

The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age. Around eight out of 10 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women over 50.

Family history

Breast cancer can be caused by genetics, but not always.

If a relative has been diagnosed with breast cancer, a person might have a higher risk of also going on to develop the disease.

But as breast cancer is common, the NHS say it is possible for more than one person in a family to be diagnosed with the illness by chance.

Genes known as BRCA1 and BRCA2 can increase your risk of developing both breast and ovarian cancer. Your GP could refer you for genetic testing if cancer runs in your family.

Dense breast tissue

Dense breast tissue can be a risk factor for breast cancer.

A woman’s breasts are made up of thousands of glands (lobules) that produce milk for breastfeeding. The tissue contains a higher concentration of breast cells than other breast tissue, making it denser.

Women with dense breast tissue may have a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

Other risk factors include hormones and hormone medicine, lifestyle and radiation.

How is breast cancer treated?

There are a range of treatments for breast cancer including;

  • surgery
  • radiotherapy
  • chemotherapy
  • hormone therapy
  • targeted therapy

Some people may have a combination of these treatments, while others will only have one. Treatment will depend on the type of breast cancer and the stage it is at.

How do I check for a lump in my breast?

The diagram below explains how to check your breasts for lumps. The NHS also provides a helpful guide.

I’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer, where can I find support?

There are a number of charities and organisations that offer support to those who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

Just some of these include; CLAN Cancer Support, Macmillan Cancer Support, Friends of Anchor and Maggie’s.

Read more…

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]