Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Expert says Nessie video may be giant eel

Post Thumbnail

A famous “sighting” of the Loch Ness Monster may finally have been solved – but the explanation could be just as scary as a monster lurking beneath the waves.

Computer experts have used advanced techniques to analyse video of the monster shot by Nessie hunter Gordon Holmes – and claim the footage actually shows giant eels sidewinding across the loch.

Mr Holmes, of Shipley in Yorkshire, hit the headlines after capturing images of mysterious creatures from a layby on the A82 at night in 2007.

This unique footage appeared to show monster-like creatures, each with a long neck and flippers.
This unique footage appeared to show monster-like creatures, each with a long neck and flippers.

The video showed a long, jet-black shape moving close to the surface for more than two minutes as it swims towards Inverness.

Several theories have been proposed to explain the creatures in recent years, including waves, otters, a large fish, seals and even mini-tornados.

But now a world-leading expert on API (application programming interface) believes he may have solved the mystery.

Bill Appleton, chief executive of US-based firm DreamFactory, took the original footage, stabilised it to reduce camera shake and increased the level of clarity.

Mr Holmes said the study had concluded the creatures were eels between 10ft-15ft long.

The 63-year-old, who is a retired university technician and had visited Loch Ness six times before capturing the footage, said he agreed with the analysis.

“For over eight years now I have struggled to interpret what the two mysterious creatures were that I was fortunate to capture on film on May 26, 2007,” he said.

A still shot from the footage
A still shot from the footage

“After several estimations, I believe the creatures were approximately 12ft long.

“I am extremely grateful to the various experts who have analysed the footage and provided me with their opinion of the creatures’ identity.

“Since eels do appear strange, ancient scary-like beasties, that may explain several of the Loch Ness sightings over the centuries.

“Unless some unknown creature is retrieved from the depths of Loch Ness, I believe Bill has finally resolved this major mystery in my life.”

It is not the first time experts have suggested eels were responsible for Nessie sightings.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology, based at Exeter in Devon, made a similar claim in 2003.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]