Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Scotland’s Covid recovery chief John Swinney tests positive before mask rule review

Deputy First Minister John Swinney.
Deputy First Minister John Swinney.

Scotland’s deputy first minister John Swinney and justice secretary Keith Brown have both tested positive for Covid.

The government’s Covid recovery chief Mr Swinney confirmed he caught the virus after two years of avoiding infection.

It emerged on the day Nicola Sturgeon announced she is phasing out the requirement to wear masks, the last remaining protective measure still in place.

Mr Swinney wrote: “After two years of avoiding Covid-19 I tested positive this morning.

“I will be self-isolating in accordance with the rules and will try to engage with @scotparl business if I feel better than I do just now.”

Perthshire MSP Mr Swinney was given the Covid recovery brief after last May’s election as Scotland moves out of the pandemic.

Keith Brown MSP.

Replying to his tweet, SNP deputy leader Keith Brown said he had also become infected for the first time.

He wrote: “Be safe John, and hopefully you’ll be better soon.

“Like you I’ve avoided it for two years until I had a positive test this morning. Thank goodness for Zoom!”

Covid cases still high

Daily virus cases in Scotland remain high with thousands becoming infected each day.

More than 2,000 patients are in hospital with the bug, but vaccines are helping keep people out of intensive care.

Most remaining Covid measures north of the border were eased two weeks ago by the first minister.

Businesses are no longer required to take track and trace details from customers, while travel rules have been relaxed across the UK.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon.

In a Covid update on Wednesday, the first minister confirmed that 9,610 new cases of coronavirus had been identified in Scotland in the last 24 hours, with figures showing around one in 11 Scots are infected.

From April 4, Scots will no longer face a legal requirement to wear face masks in places of worship or while attending a marriage ceremony or civil partnerships.

Masks rules will also be converted to guidance for funeral services.

Two weeks later on April 18 the legal requirement to wear masks in shops, on public transport and in other indoor settings will also be scrapped and changed to guidance.

Covid Scotland: Key dates as Nicola Sturgeon scraps face mask laws

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]

More from the Press and Journal Scottish politics team

More from the Press and Journal