Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

How much will your EV cost to charge at home?

EV charging now part of the mix
EV charging now part of the mix

As electric vehicle range begins to improve, charging stations and forecourts will have to boost capacity if they’re to cope with the surge in demand for electricity.

Charging at home looks set to become commonplace to avoid EV forecourt backlogs. As part of their Pump to Plug ReportUswitch car insurance decided to crunch some numbers to find the most and least expensive EVs to charge at home (most popular models, cost per mile, taking the UK average cost per usable capacity charge of 18.8p /kWh).

While EV forecourts have still to be rolled out across the country, home charging will remain an option for many EV drivers.

Most expensive to charge at home:

Mercedes EQV 300 at full battery capacity and with a range of 200 costs £16.92; in second place the Tesla Cybertruck Tri Motor (range 465 miles) at £37.60 to “fill up” and in third place for most expensive charge at home is the Audi e-tron S 55 quattro at £16.22 and a 200 mile range (£0.085, £0.081 and £0.081 average cost per mile, respectively).

Least expensive to charge at home:

Tesla takes the top three spots here with the cheapest being the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus at £9.40 to top up with a 210 mile range, Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus LFP (£9.40 and 205 mile range) and third cheapest, the Tesla Model 3 Long Range Dual Motor costing £13.16 full charge at 285 miles – £0.045, £0.046 and £0.046 cost per mile.

Cars can now be driven for as little as a penny a mile for the first time since 1972

Outside Tesla dominance are Hyundai IONIQ Electric, Seat M11 and the Mini EV who give the Tesla crown a run for its money with £0.047 cost per mile or less.

With EDF pointing out that cars can now be driven for as little as a penny a mile for the first time since 1972, charging at home can knock hundreds off annual fuel bills. So while we wait for fully EV forecourts to become the norm, you can at least set off from home knowing you’ve got a full charge in the bag for a bargain price.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]