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Sweet treats: Test your chocolatier skills with this recipe for chocolate peanut butterflies

Chocolate peanut butterflies.

Chocolate and peanuts are one of the finest duos out there.

That salty, nutty, rich and sweet combination lends itself beautifully to everything from cheesecake to brownies.

But for those of you looking for a more out-there (and challenging) treat to make, then these chocolate peanut butterflies are the perfect choice.

Featuring peanut butter and not just one type of chocolate but three – milk, white and dark – these delights are bound to go down well.

Just try not to devour them all in one go.

For more inspiration when it comes to dessert and sweet treat ideas, take a look at the previous recipes in this series here.


Chocolate peanut butterflies

Makes 10

Ingredients

  • 130g smooth peanut butter
  • 3 tbsp icing sugar, sifted
  • 150g milk or dark chocolate, chopped
  • 50g red modelling chocolate or fondant
  • 100g clear isomalt
  • 2 squares white chocolate, to use as glue for the wings

Method

  1. In a small bowl, mix the peanut butter with the icing sugar until fully incorporated. Refrigerate for 15 minutes.
  2. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Take the peanut butter mixture out of the fridge and shape into 10 ovals (for the bodies) and 10 balls (for the heads).
  3. Stick together to create 10 flies, then place on the lined baking tray and chill for another 15 minutes.
  4. Melt the milk or dark chocolate in a microwaveable bowl in the microwave, working in 30-second intervals.
  5. Remove the peanut butter bodies from the fridge and dip them into the melted chocolate, then place back on the baking paper.
  6. Make the eyes out of the red modelling chocolate or fondant and stick them on with a little of the melted chocolate.
  7. To make the wings, melt the isomalt according to the packet instructions and, using a teaspoon, pour into a wing shape on a silicone veiner or baking paper. Leave to cool.
  8. Meanwhile, melt the white chocolate in a microwaveable bowl in the microwave, working in 20-30 second intervals.
  9. Once the wings are cool, attach them to the body with a little melted white chocolate.
  10. Pipe the legs on to baking paper using the leftover milk or dark chocolate and leave to set, then attach them to the body with a little more melted chocolate. They’re fiddly, so be patient.

Recipe from The Witch-Crafting Handbook by Helena Garcia (Quadrille, £15). Photography ©Patricia Niven.


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