This should be our new year’s resolution: be open to all that life holds

'Walking The Labyrinth' is a traditional activity taking place on New Year's Eve in Dornoch Cathedral. Visitors are invited to walk the path laid out in stones and lights on the stone floor of the Cathedral as though it were in life - meeting others on their way to the heart.
    Back in medieval times the labyrinth was used as a symbol of the Christian journey and was included in a design on the floor of churches which people would choose to walk on special and holy days.
    The classical labyrinth has as its starting point the cross which the becomes the focus for meditation in the labyrinth experience.
    At its most basic level the journey round the labyrinth is a metaphor for the journey to the centre of your deepest self and back out into the world with a broadened understanding of who you are - which is why it seemed right to experience it at the end of one year and the start of another.
    These Labyrinths were originally set out for those who could not physically embark upon a true pilgrimage, so ensuring they could share in the spiritual soul-searching of those who could.
    The Labyrinth in Dornoch Cathedral was originally set out by the Youth Group for their own use, however they were persuaded to set it out for the Congregation last Hogmanay. The feedback was good, so it was repeated this year. Susan also set it out after the Lent Study last Easter.
    The Labyrinth was set out in 2004 by;
Reverend Susan Brown, Derek Brown (her husband), Susan's sister Mo Harkin and her son Jamie Harkin. Ruth MacKay was on hand to ensure extinguished candles were re-lit.
    From my personal experience of this Labyrinth, it was a very quiet and peaceful experience. Music was playing gently in the background and the only light was from the lit candles on the floor. I suspect that the religious significance of the candles and the pebbles are from Jesus' words - He is the Light and the Rock.
'Walking The Labyrinth' is a traditional activity taking place on New Year's Eve in Dornoch Cathedral. Visitors are invited to walk the path laid out in stones and lights on the stone floor of the Cathedral as though it were in life - meeting others on their way to the heart. Back in medieval times the labyrinth was used as a symbol of the Christian journey and was included in a design on the floor of churches which people would choose to walk on special and holy days. The classical labyrinth has as its starting point the cross which the becomes the focus for meditation in the labyrinth experience. At its most basic level the journey round the labyrinth is a metaphor for the journey to the centre of your deepest self and back out into the world with a broadened understanding of who you are - which is why it seemed right to experience it at the end of one year and the start of another. These Labyrinths were originally set out for those who could not physically embark upon a true pilgrimage, so ensuring they could share in the spiritual soul-searching of those who could. The Labyrinth in Dornoch Cathedral was originally set out by the Youth Group for their own use, however they were persuaded to set it out for the Congregation last Hogmanay. The feedback was good, so it was repeated this year. Susan also set it out after the Lent Study last Easter. The Labyrinth was set out in 2004 by; Reverend Susan Brown, Derek Brown (her husband), Susan's sister Mo Harkin and her son Jamie Harkin. Ruth MacKay was on hand to ensure extinguished candles were re-lit. From my personal experience of this Labyrinth, it was a very quiet and peaceful experience. Music was playing gently in the background and the only light was from the lit candles on the floor. I suspect that the religious significance of the candles and the pebbles are from Jesus' words - He is the Light and the Rock.

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