Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Tidal energy firm Nova Innovation gets £2m cash boost to support its global ambitions

Nova tidal
l-r Nova Innovation chief executive Simon Forrest and Net-zero Secretary Michael Matheson.

Tidal energy firm Nova Innovation has been awarded a £2 million cash injection from the Scottish Government to advance turbine manufacturing to a global level.

The funding, delivered through Scottish Enterprise, is directed at Nova’s Volt (volume manufacturing and logistics for tidal energy) project, which runs until 2023.

I look forward to Nova Innovation capitalising on this funding to drive forward what is an incredibly exciting opportunity to advance tidal energy’s potential.”

Michael Matheson, Scottish Government

Volt is aimed at developing the first European assembly line to mass manufacture tidal turbines, and trial innovative techniques and tools to ship, deploy and monitor turbines around the world – helping to meet the challenge of global warming.

The project will examine how to improve turbine performance, logistics for mass manufacture and new techniques to ensure cost-effective delivery of tidal machines.

It is also expected to deliver an adaptable remote observation platform for rapid environmental monitoring of tidal energy sites.

The latest tidal turbine, called Eunice, from Nova Innovation.

Nova chief executive Simon Forrest said: “We would like to thank the Scottish Government for their swift, high-impact support in helping secure overseas contracts.

“This support is significant and very welcome as it sees Nova and the wider sector shift onto an industrial footing. It is an endorsement of Nova’s global ambition to transform the power of our seas into clean, predictable energy, empowering coastal communities all around the world.”

Mr Forrest added: “Nova has an exceptional track record for delivery, and we look forward to successfully delivering the Volt project – making tidal energy mainstream worldwide.”

Eunice, pre-installation.

Net-zero Secretary Michael Matheson said: “With our abundant natural resources and expertise, Scotland is ideally-placed to harness the enormous global market for marine energy, whilst helping deliver a net-zero economy both here and across the world. That’s why we are determined to help the sector grow and develop.

“The Volt project marks an important milestone in commercialising the sector, and I look forward to Nova Innovation capitalising on this funding to drive forward what is an incredibly exciting opportunity to advance tidal energy’s potential.”

Nova’s turbines have been powering the Shetland grid for more than five years and will soon be deployed in North America and mainland Europe. In delivering Volt, Edinburgh-based Nova aims to demonstrate what is required to efficiently scale up the production of tidal energy devices around the world.

Tidal energy costs are falling rapidly as the sector scales up. It offers a competitive alternative to diesel generation in many markets and is predicted to become cheaper than nuclear by 2030. It is estimated the global market size of tidal energy by 2050 could be worth up to £126 billion.


Scottish firm hails launch of the world’s most powerful tidal energy turbine a success

Gas network operator heading for all-Canadian ownership after £1.2bn-plus deal

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]