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New Inverness top up water tap on banks of River Ness ready to flow

To go with story by Chris Cromar. Residents and visitors to Inverness are being encouraged to use a new Scottish Water Top Up Tap on the banks of the River Ness to stay hydrated while on the go. Picture shows; Councillors Isabelle MacKenzie, Alex Graham, Bet McAllister, Trish Robertson. Inverness. Supplied by Scottish Water Date; Unknown
To go with story by Chris Cromar. Residents and visitors to Inverness are being encouraged to use a new Scottish Water Top Up Tap on the banks of the River Ness to stay hydrated while on the go. Picture shows; Councillors Isabelle MacKenzie, Alex Graham, Bet McAllister, Trish Robertson. Inverness. Supplied by Scottish Water Date; Unknown

Residents and visitors to Inverness are being encouraged to use a new Scottish Water tap on the banks of the River Ness to stay hydrated while on the go.

Located at the start of Ness Walk, it is the second to be installed in the city, joining an existing one situated on the High Street, which was launched in 2019.

The free water refill points are part of the company’s Your Water, Your Life campaign which aims to get people using Scotland’s tap water, while also reducing single-use plastic waste by encouraging the use of refillable bottles.

Officially launched by councillors Alex Graham, Isabelle MacKenzie, Bet McAllister and Trish Robertson, the location was put forward by Highland Council to support the development of the city’s active travel network.

‘A great addition to the city’

Councillor Trish Robertson said: “This is a great addition to the city, together with the existing tap in the High Street.  The tap on Ness Walk particularly enhances one of our best used and most attractive active travel routes, enabling people to stay hydrated when walking, wheeling or cycling alongside our beautiful river, linking the attractions of the city centre with a wealth of green spaces.

“Carrying a refillable water bottle so that you can top up from the tap is good for you and good for your pocket. By reducing our reliance on single use plastic and the potential for litter, it’s also a great way to help the environment, both here in the Highlands and globally.”

70 taps have now been installed at sites across Scotland including harbours, beaches, national parks, botanical gardens and other tourist attractions.

The Ness Walk tap is the sixth so far in the Highlands, with more on the way.

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