Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Garmouth flooding: Concerns ‘crisis point’ could be nearing for Moray village

Farmer Angus Fettes is appealing for more maintenance to be undertaken on the River Spey to reduce flooding.
Farmer Angus Fettes is appealing for more maintenance to be undertaken on the River Spey to reduce flooding.

A flooding expert fears Garmouth may be nearing a “crisis point” as residents continue to battle to save their homes.

Water from the River Spey has poured through the stricken Moray village 11 times since October – including four times within one traumatic February week.

The constant worry has led to homeowners working through the night with pumps and sandbags while some have bags packed in case they need to flee.

‘It’s effectively crisis point for flooding now’

Geomorphologist Hamish Moir, managing director of Inverness-based cbec Eco Engineering, has been studying flooding concerns near Garmouth for 18 months and believes a “crisis point” may be nearing.

He said: “I was contacted by the angling club about concerns with the way the river was changing, but it quickly became apparent there were bigger issues.

“It’s flooding, but the issues is not so much that. It’s the fact that the river is changing its course and doing so in a way that is presenting a risk to property and infrastructure, particularly in Garmouth.

Hamish Moir, UK managing director of cbec Eco Engineering.

“This section has always been nomadic, it’s just the way the river is.

“You can’t force it to move, that will just make it worse, but there are things you can do to encourage it to move.

“If we had a really big flood event like Storm Frank in 2015, it would cause a massive problem.

“It’s effectively crisis point now for Ross House, as the corner of the house is now the bank of the river.

“But the golf course, sewage works and infrastructure and property in Garmouth could all be at risk.”

Ross House near Garmouth is on the brink of falling into the River Spey.

Garmouth farmer fears flooding have made fields useless

Floods in recent months have toppled large trees to the ground on the banks of the River Spey.

It is understood that erosion has led to fields flooding at lower water levels, causing water to pour over fields more often – and remain there for longer.

Mr Moir has suggested that identifying locations to deposit gravel and fallen trees may help to steer the water away from Garmouth.

Farmer Angus Fettes has three fields on the banks of the Spey and believes they have been rendered useless by the repeated floods.

He said: “There’s no chance I’ll get anything out of them this year and I wouldn’t risk animals there at the moment either.

Water from the River Spey pouring over fields owned by Angus Fettes in February 2021.

“Garmouth has always flooded, it always will, but the big problem has come from the erosion because there’s been no bank maintenance.

“We’re not looking for a 20ft wall to be built, just for it to be properly maintained.”

Moray Council has commissioned a study to examine the recent changes to the River Spey in the Garmouth area.

A spokesman for Crown Estate Scotland said: “The management of flood defence provision on this section of the River Spey lies with the local authority and not with Crown Estate Scotland.

“We have been happy to voluntarily contribute funding towards efforts to mitigate the erosion which has been taking place in this area.

“We have also worked extensively with Moray Council, Nature Scot and Sepa to see how we can contribute to the management of the river and stand ready to work with others as they work to resolve the situation.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]