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Moray man fined for neglecting dog which had to be put to sleep – and advised to ‘seriously reconsider’ having animals in future

Patch had to be put to sleep following the neglect.
Patch had to be put to sleep following the neglect.

A Moray man has been fined £480 for failing to seek veterinary treatment for his pet spaniel who had been seriously neglected over a long period of time.

Richard Reynolds, 55, and his wife Lesley, 58, both pleaded guilty to failing to get their dog, Patch, treatment.

The couple, from Grange, Keith, appeared at Elgin Sheriff Court last week.

Mr Reynolds was fined £480 while his wife was admonished.

The Scottish SPCA – who investigated the neglect – said the pair had shown total “disregard” for their dog and hope they will “seriously reconsider” their ability to keep animals in the future.

The animal welfare charity said that Patch, a 13-year-old black and white cavalier King Charles spaniel, had been seriously neglected over a long period of time, leading him to have multiple health conditions.

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He was put to sleep on welfare grounds following the lack of veterinary care.

Scottish SPCA officers found that Patch would have been in a considerable amount of pain for a number of months – and the officers felt there was no credible reason why the Reynolds would not have noticed the dog’s suffering.

Unclean and depressed

Among other things, Patch was depressed, underweight and had matted faeces on his fur.

Scottish SPCA inspector Amanda Watson described the state Patch was in when they went to collect him.

“Patch was unclean, depressed and almost collapsed when we took him to be examined by a vet,” she said.

“He had at least six lumps of matted faeces attached to various parts of his body.

“He was in an emaciated body condition and weighed just four and a half kilos. The average weight of a male cavalier King Charles spaniel usually ranges from six to eight kilos.

“On top of this, Patch had a grade three to four pansystolic heart murmur, a considerable amount of tartar covering his molars and pre molars causing his gums to recede, and gave no indication that he had any sight.

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“Upon further examination of his eyes his reactions were consistent with having keratitis which would have caused Patch a lot of pain.”

A post-mortem revealed further health complications that “undoubtedly” contributed towards his death.

These included severe chronic dental disease, a severe case of ear mites, mitral valve disease, suspected renal disease and a low body condition score.

‘Disregard for Patch’

The Scottish SPCA welcomed the case going to court, but said they had hoped the pair would be banned from keeping animals in the future.

Ms Watson said: “Although we’re glad that Mr Reynolds has received a fine we would have liked for both him and Lesley Reynolds to have received a ban on keeping animals due to the disregard they showed for Patch’s well-being in this case, which undoubtedly contributed towards his death.

“We hope they seriously reconsider their ability to care for any animal in future.”

Anyone who is concerned about an animal can contact the Scottish SPCA’s confidential animal helpline on 03000 999 999.

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