Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner. Facebook Messenger An icon of the facebook messenger app logo. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Facebook Messenger An icon of the Twitter app logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. WhatsApp Messenger An icon of the Whatsapp messenger app logo. Email An icon of an mail envelope. Copy link A decentered black square over a white square.

Scottish farming chief thanks shoppers for supporting the sector

NFU Scotland president Martin Kennedy.

The chief of Scotland’s farming union has thanked members of the public for supporting the sector in the past year.

NFU Scotland president, Martin Kennedy, issued a note of thanks to shoppers as new figures show an increase in sales of British and Scottish red meat and dairy products.

Data from red meat levy body Quality Meat Scotland (QMS) shows sales of red meat in the UK were up 7% in the 12 weeks to July 3, when compared with the same pre-Covid period in 2019.

QMS said the growth was mainly driven by sales of beef, and data for August shows the value of sales of sausages was up £5 million, while the value of sales of fresh beef was up £1.7m.

UK levy body, the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB), has also reported growth in the dairy sector with sales of cow’s milk and cheese up 4.2% and 4.5% respectively in the past year.

Sales of red meat are up on the year, according to QMS figures.

Mr Kennedy welcomed the sales figures and said: “In these well documented, challenging times for all, it is extremely encouraging and appreciated that there is a demand for Scottish produce.

“We as an industry have much to be proud of, with our high environmental and welfare standards, and I want to thank the public for their support of Scottish agriculture.”

He said farmers greatly appreciated consumers making informed choices to ask for and buy Scottish produce in shops and restaurants.

“It is important that supermarkets also play their part in ensuring that British and Scottish produce is readily available on shelves,” added Mr Kennedy.

Meanwhile, new research commissioned by farm assurance body Red Tractor has shown high levels of trust for home-grown food among British consumers.

More than 3,500 adults across the UK were quizzed on their attitudes towards food by YouGov with 84% saying they trusted food from the UK.

The research also found 48% cited high standards and regulation as the reason they trust food in the UK, and 70% believe inspection and assurance schemes play a role in ensuring the UK’s food is safe and of good quality.

Research by farm assurance body Red Tractor found high levels of trust for home-produced food.

Trust in food from outside the UK varied, with imported food produced in Ireland and New Zealand attracting the highest levels of trust amongst UK consumers, followed by EU countries such as Sweden, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands.

Only a quarter of those surveyed said they trusted food from the USA, and 11% said they trusted food from China.

Red Tractor chairman, Christine Tacon, welcomed the findings and said domestic standards were key to maintaining consumer trust.

She said: “If we want to maintain trust in UK food over the coming years, the most important thing isn’t what trade deals we sign with other countries.

“It’s whether we keep backing our food standards regime, led by the Food Standards Agency, and supported by the many food assurance schemes which have been established over the past 20 years.”

Farmer efforts to keep meat and dairy on the menu in January pay off